Recently in Driver License Agreement Category

October 3, 2012

Older Driver Safety in Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia

According to the Associated Press, older drivers are on the road more than ever before. Nearly 34 million drivers are 65 or older. By 2030, deferral estimates show there will be about 57 million, making up about a quarter of all licensed drivers.

Older drivers have the highest rate of deadly crashes per mile even though they don't drive as often as younger drivers. Measured by miles driven, older drivers crash rates begin to rise in their 70s and even more in their 80s, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

Health Issues can also impair older drivers. Health issues such as: arthritis and dementia, slower reflexes and they also use multiple medications, which can impair their driving. On average, about 60% of seniors voluntarily cut back their driving. Most avoid driving at night, on interstates and during bad weather. Older drivers seem to have more difficulty with intersections, making left turns, and changing lanes and/or merging. This is due to their gradual decline in vision and reaction times that come with aging.

In the District of Columbia seniors are required to have more vision tests, are required to renew their licenses more often than younger drivers and starting at the age of 70, older drivers must submit a doctor's certification that they are healthy enough to drive every time they renew their licenses. In Maryland, the Motor Vehicle Administration requires all people, starting at the age of 40, to take eye exams, and in Virginia, starting at the age of 80, drivers must renew their license in person and also pass an eye exam.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration proposed a national guideline for older driver safety earlier this summer. The proposal recommends that every state needs a program to improve older driver safety, doctors should be protected from lawsuits id they report a possibly unsafe driver and driver's licenses should be renewed in person after a certain age. These recommendations would push states to become more consistent and have safer roads.

August 12, 2011

Emergency Contact Information Database Now Available in Maryland

Drivers in the state of Maryland can now electronically store emergency contact information onto their driving records at the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration. This information will help police officers and other law enforcement officials contact family members of people involved in serious and fatal automobile accidents quicker.

Contact information can be uploaded by visiting the MVA website at www.mva.maryland.gov/emvastore/ or by visiting any MVA kiosks located at both full and express MVA locations. Any Maryland driver with a valid Maryland driver's license or state issued identification card can add up to three emergency contacts. The contact information is safely stored and is only accessible to law enforcement officials.

In order to upload your contact information online; you will need the following:
- an email address or phone number
- driver's license number
- date of birth
- last 4 digits of your Social Security number

Eight other states have the same type of emergency contact program to date. Some of the states that do not do offer a downloadable emergency contact card that people can carry with them at all times.

May 31, 2011

Maryland Drivers Ranked Among the Worst Drivers in the U.S.

GMAC Insurance published the results of an annual National Driver's Test in May 2011 which ranked the state of Maryland 49th out of 51 states with the worst knowledge of the rules of the road. Maryland scored 73.3%. Hawaii was behind with 73% and the District of Columbia was ranked the worst. The state with the best results, of 82.9% was Kansas.

Maryland's test results for 2011 came as a surprise, seeing that the state ranked 20th in 2010 and 41st in the 2009 results. The 29 place plunge in this year results were only beaten by Alaska, which went from 10th to 40th place.

The GMAC Insurance Annual National Driver's Test polls 5130 drivers aged 16-65 nationwide. The test consists of 20 questions taken from each state's driver's license exam. The average results nationwide for 2011 improved from 76.2% to 77.9%.

The Chief Marketing Officer for GMAC, Mr. Scott Eckman, stated that drivers are forgetting some of the more basic rules of the road. Driver's are most commonly forgetting the distance a driver must keep between their vehicle and the one in front and also how to respond when a traffic light turns yellow just a vehicle reaches the intersection. The rule is to continue through the intersection, rather than braking abruptly. Only 15% of people answered the later question correctly.


December 20, 2010

Speeding Tickets: Do They Follow You From State to State?

Q: Speeding Tickets: Do Speeding Tickets Affect Your Driver's License Status in another state?
A: Yes, and here is how:

There are three major databases that keep track of your driver's license information: the National Driver Register (NDR), the Driver License Compact (DLC) and the Non-Resident Violator Compact (NRVC).
The NDR was created by The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) in 2000. The organizations primary purpose is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries. This includes both commercial drivers and regular drivers. The list keeps track of drivers who have had their licenses revoked, suspended or who have been convicted of serious traffic violations. The data is collected and submitted nationwide to the NDR and every states as well as the District of Columbia is obligated to check the NDR before issuing out a drivers license.

The DLC and NRVC are responsible for how your tickets actually follow you.

The NDR, DLC and NRVC are products of the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA). This organization is a non-profit organization and it is tax-exempted. The AAMVA develops programs in motor vehicle administration, law enforcement and highway safety. Though the organization forms policies for such things are laws against radar and laser detector use, it is up to each individual state to ratify and join any provision.

The DLC is responsible for making a violation in another state effective/equivalent to a violation in your home state. For example, if your license was suspended in Virginia and you currently live in Maryland, your license will also be suspended in Maryland and points will be issued to your driving record.

The NRVC works similarly than the DLC, except that it will not add points to your driving record. If we follow the example above and you get a ticket in Virginia and you live in Maryland and do not pay the ticket, Maryland will suspend your license until you handle the issue in Virginia, without adding any points to your driving record.

A new organization will be forming called the Driver License Agreement (DLA). Any state that becomes a member of the DLA will submit to its regulations. The DLA will require all member states to take action even if the home state doesn't have the same statute under which you were ticketed out of your home state. For example, if you are issued a careless driving citation in Virginia but your home state does not have such a violation, then your home state will look for the closest equivalent citation it could issue and assess points and penalties based on that. The AAMVA is working to make the DLA international. In the near future the DLA will include South America, Europe, Australia and Africa.

The DLA also requires that all member states make all information available to non-member states as well. Though the DLA is in its early stages, it is inevitable that all states within the US, Canada and Mexico will become members.