Recently in Child Safety Category

July 17, 2012

Recall: Old Navy Toddler Aqua Socks for Girls

Old Navy Toddler aqua socks for girls are being recalled by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) for slip and fall hazard. It was determined by the CPSC that these Old Navy socks have less traction when used on wet or smooth surfaces.

The recall is being issued for all socks with style number 896452. The style number can be found in a small tag inside the sock. The socks were priced between $12 and $15. They were sold in Toddler sizes 5-11 and in colors pink and purple.

More than 30,000 units were sold in the US in the first 6 months of 2012.

People who have purchased the Old Navy Toddler Aqua Sock for girls should immediately stop using them and return them to any Old Navy store for a full refund.

For more information, contact Old Navy at (866)580-9930 or by e-mail at custserv@oldnavy.com

June 12, 2012

LATCH System Regulation Updates

Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children (LATCH) system regulations will change for child safety seats, according to the safety guidelines established by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The change in guidelines will take place in 2014. The LATCH system is designed to hold up to 65 pounds (child and car seat weight combined). The new rule is called the FMVXX 213 and will go into effect on February 27, 2014. The rule will require car seats with internal harnesses to have a label indicating the maximum child weight for using lower LATCH anchors to secure the car seat in a motor vehicle. The new label would specify a maximum child weight between 45 to 53 pounds for using lower LATCH systems.

March 12, 2012

Should Smoking Be Banned in Vehicles with Children Under the Age of 8 in Maryland?

Cigarette.jpgVarious studies have linked secondhand smoke to asthma and other chronic illnesses in children, therefore; the Maryland Senate opened discussions in late February 2012, in which a Ban on smoking inside vehicles with child passengers would be put into legislation. If passed, the new bill would fine drivers and passengers up to $50 if they are caught smoking in a vehicle with a passenger 8 years old or younger, but it would not be considered a moving violation and would not add points to a persons' driving record.

The bill would reduce the number of long-term illnesses caused by and associated with secondhand smoke and it would also lower the state's medical costs.

Studies have shown that secondhand smoking is more harmful in cars than in other areas and locations. The toxicity levels have sometimes reached 10 times greater than those deemed acceptable by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Children exposed to smoke are more likely to die from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome than babies who are not exposed to smoke. These babies have also been shown to have weaker lungs and increased risk of other health problems because they have been exposed to smoke. Also, children exposed to secondhand smoke experience more severe and frequent asthma attacks and are at a higher risk for ear infections then those not exposed to secondhand smoke.

Over 4,000 different chemicals have been identified in secondhand smoke and over 40 of these chemicals have shown to cause cancer, therefore; children exposed to secondhand smoke are being poisoned and have no choice in the matter. It is up to the parent and/or guardian to keep children safe and healthy and therefore; bills like this one should be passed.