Recently in Automobile Accidents Category

October 5, 2015

Distracted Driving

Distracted driving is defined as driving while engaged in activity that has the potential to distract the driver from the task of driving such as texting or talking on a cell phone, applying make-up, eating, etc.

As the dangers of distracted driving became more and more clear, states began to fund awareness campaigns such as online videos of real-life tragedies from distracted driving and add laws to make it easier for police officers to pull drivers over issue tickets.

Use of handheld devices, while driving, is prohibited in 14 states and the District of Columbia and is considered a primary enforcement law. As for texting while driving, 46 states and D.C. ban text messaging for all drivers. All but 5 states have primary enforcement on their texting ban.

All of these laws and new restrictions have been put in effect because distracted driving has been responsible for too many accidents, injuries and deaths across the United States. It is ultimately the drivers' responsibility and drivers need to be aware of their surroundings and driving conditions before getting behind the wheel. Driving is a privileged and drivers need to remember that and take responsibility for their actions. Safety should come first.

May 4, 2015

Motorcycle Fatalities on the Rise in Maryland

In the state of Maryland, an average of, 60 to 70 motorcyclists, are killed annually, and another 1,400 riders and passengers are injured. The total number of traffic fatalities dropped to its lowest level in over 60 years, while motorcycle fatalities increased, in 2014.

66 drivers were killed in 2014 and that number rose from 62 in 2013. It is said that warmer weathers bring more motorcycle riders into the roads, and, therefore; motorcycling coincides with an increase in motorcycle-involved crashes and injuries. Research shows that three out of every four police reported motorcycle crashes result in an injury to the rider. Four out of every 10 riders killed had been drinking and many have very high blood alcohol concentrations. Balance, vision, judgment and responsive reflexes are all critical to riding a motorcycle safety and alcohol affects all of those.

Last week, the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration (MVA) and the Maryland Motorcycle Safety Coalition announced the launch of a new campaign to remind motorcycle riders and vehicle drivers how important it is to the Share the Road.

Beginning in May, and throughout the summer months, the campaign will use highway message signs, radio and web advertisements, banners at MVA offices and motorcycle dealerships, direct outreach at motorcycle events and yard signs throughout the state to increase awareness and reduce crashes.

April 13, 2015

Distracted Teen Drivers

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety studied over 1,700 crash videos involving teen drivers and discovered that distracted driving contributes to 58 percent of automobile crashes. Teen drivers are distracted in a much greater percentage of crashes then adult drivers. The analysis counted six types of distractions that caused crashes. The leading causes of crashes being the interaction with other passengers, made up 15 percent of crashes. The use of cell phones came in second at 12 percent, followed by looking at or for something inside the car, looking at something outside other than the road ahead, singing or moving to music, grooming and reaching for something were the other factors that contributed to distracted driving in teens.

The fact that teen drivers have spent less time behind the wheel and are unable to manage unsafe conditions are also factors in the study.

Parents can have a system installed in their vehicles that monitors the drivers movements and driving habits. These in car systems collect video, audio and acceleration date when the driver triggers the device by braking hard, taking a corner fast or receiving a hard impact. The video is about 12 seconds and it provides data on the eight seconds before and four seconds after the trigger. This system is made by Lytx and is also used in commercial and government vehicles.

The data analyzed by researchers comprised of over 6,800 videos of crashes involving drivers between the ages of 16 and 19 and between August 2007 and July 2013.

The research found that using a cell phone, be it for texting or calling, caused teen drivers to become distracted for an average of 4.1 seconds in the final six seconds before a crash impact. Also, when teen drivers caused rear end collisions, in more than half the time they crashed without braking or attempting to steer to avoid the collision.

In 2013, federal data showed that about 963,000 drivers between the ages of 16 and 19 were involved in crashes. These crashes caused 383,000 injuries and 2,865 deaths.

April 2, 2015

Lowest Levels of Traffic Deaths in Maryland since 1948

In March of 2015, a report published, by the state transportation officials, stated that 442 traffic deaths were reported in Maryland for 2014. That is the lowest level it has been since 1948. The highest record was in 1968 with a total of 872 traffic deaths.

In the past 50 years, Maryland has cut the number of traffic deaths by half thanks to its hard work on highways, in the community and in the legislature. It was with these comprehensive and aggressive initiatives that have enhanced highway safety over the last 50 years. Laws have been put in effect to fight impaired and distracted driving and increase seat belt, as well as, motorcycle helmet use, statewide. Also, one must consider the advances in technology and better medical care for the decrease in traffic deaths.
For example, in 1969, Maryland's Medevac Program and Shock Trauma were introduced and with these programs the death toll has decreased.

Maryland transportation officials have a program in effect called the Strategic Highway Safety Plan, which addresses six major areas of traffic safety. These areas are the following:

- Aggressive driving prevention,
- Impaired driving prevention,
- Distracted driving prevention,
- Highway infrastructure,
- Occupant protection, and;
- Pedestrian safety

Other campaigns include Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over and Checkpoint Strikeforce and the newest program which is called ENDUI. It is an app available at Google Play for Android devices and iTunes for iPhones, which is intended to prevent impaired driving by helping people plan ahead or find a safe ride home if and when they have been drinking.

For more information on Maryland's Zero Deaths Campaign, you may visit the following website:

February 18, 2015

Why Does a Person Leave an Accident Scene?

What causes someone to leave the scene of an automobile accident, where another person might have been harmed?

Fleeing an accident is not uncommon, but there is little date on the behavior.
In the state of Maryland; there are an average of 24 deaths due to hit-and-run drivers and nationwide its about 1,600 deaths. The accidents involved striking someone on foot, riding a bicycle on in another car.

Psychologists and those who study human behavior say the drivers likely experience a flood of emotions including dear, shame and guilt. These emotions overwhelm their sense of self-control and so they flee an accident scene without making their identities known. There are some who are also under the influence of alcohol and/or other drugs. Alcohol is a factor in about 30 percent of traffic fatalities nationwide.

An elevated Blood alcohol level can hinder the rational decision making process and clearly makes it more difficult for someone to make a good decision. Carlo DiClemente, a psychology professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County says "Fear and escape motivations kick in and, without good executive functioning, make flight more probable."

A person's upbringing and culture can also affect the reaction of a person. If while growing up, a person has been recognized for good behavior and telling the truth, it generally means they will own up to their mistakes, where, those that were always punished or physically injured for their behavior would be less likely to take responsibility for their actions/mistake.

The majority of hit-and-run accidents occur on weekends, when people are walking out more, and at night, when it's harder to see, therefore; drivers, cyclists and pedestrians all need to be more aware of others on the road and need to make sure they can be seen. Reflective gear for walkers and cyclists are important, as well as not drinking or using cellphones for those behind the wheel.

In most states, it is illegal to drive with a blood-alcohol concentration above 0.08 percent. In 2014, 12 states and the District of Columbia banned the use of hand-held cellphones while driving, and 41 states and the District of Columbia have banned texting while driving. Maryland has enacted both bans.

There was a study conducted by psychologists, Frank Farley, in Temple University that categorized three different types of personalities for those who would leave the scene of a car crash.

1) The risk taker - self-confident and energetic and someone who feels in control of their fate. This person tends to drink more and is therefore more likely to get into an accident. This type of person would rather take the risk of fleeing than face the consequences of staying.

2) Little impulse control. Fear, adrenaline and "fight or flight" instincts kick in and they act before they think. This type of person may, however, return to the scene once they start thinking clearly.

3) "Guilty Knowledge". This type of person know they are doing something wrong, such as drinking, driving without a license or are with someone they aren't suppose to be with. This persona may also be someone in a leadership position, such as a police officer or political.

January 20, 2015

Safest to Riskiest States in the U.S.

According to a new report by, Automobile insurance requirements vary widely among states. The District of Columbia and the 50 states were ranked from safest to riskiest by awarding points based on the minimum coverage requirements for the mandatory forms of automobile insurance in each state and also the percentages of uninsured drivers in those specific states. Points were also assigned to those states that had other types of insurance requirements, such as personal injury protection, medical payments coverage and/or uninsured motorist coverage.

It was determined that the state of Maine has the most stringent requirements. Maine requires minimum bodily injury coverage per person of $50,000 and per accident of $100,000 and minimum property damage coverage per accident of $25,000. North Dakota, New York, Maryland, New Hampshire and Utah followed.

The report also took into account that many states, nationwide, as well as the District of Columbia, have bans on hand-held cellphone use and some states and the District of Columbia even ban texting while driving. Therefore; a driver who crashes while distracted may be held liable for damages.

For more information, visit

December 22, 2014

Over 60 Million Automobile Recalls Reported in 2014

As a result of Takata Corporation Air bag problems and General Motors Company defective ignition switches, over 60 million U.S. Automobile recalls were reported in 2014. The total to date is well over 60.5 million, making it the highest ever and twice the previous annual record of 30.8 million set in 2004, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. This number will rise, even more, as recent recalls have been announce but not recorded, as of yet.

The number will continue to rise in the coming years, mainly, because of the Takata air-bag recalls and GM defective ignition switches. It is because of the slow response to GM's ignition switch defect that the number will continue to rise. Therefore; the NHTSA has pressured automakers to recall cars more quickly when evidence of a flaw is detected. It is with the use of subpoena power and the threat of hefty fines that the NHTSA can pressure automakers to solve their recall problems more quickly.

GM recalled 27 million cars and trucks in the U.S. in 2014, a record for any single automaker. According to the NHTSA, GM issued 10 safety actions of more than 1 million vehicles each. Mainly, for their ignition switch problems; which led to, 42 deaths and 58 injuries. These recalls caused GM almost $2.47 billion through the first three quarters of 2014.

Takata air bag recalls, however, were made on 5.4 million vehicles, mostly from Honda Motors Co. Other recalls of more than 1 million vehicles included steering, cruise control, engines and seat belt problems. The investigation to flaws in the Takata airbags, were for about 8 million vehicles. It was detected that these airbags exploded with excessive force and spread shrapnel through the car during a crash. An estimated 4 people died as a result and over 100 were injured.

Therefore; it is imperative that every consumer is aware of recalls when they are attempting to purchase a new or used vehicle. There are certain sites one can visit to research whether a recall has been issued for the vehicle one is interested in, and dealership can also inform the consumer of safety issues with every vehicle on their inventory.

December 4, 2014

General Motors Ignition Switch Recall Victim's Compensation Fund Cases to Be Heard in 2016

The General Motors Ignition Switch Recall Victim's Compensation Fund was launched in August of 2014. To date, there have been over 2,200 personal injury claims filed, with 36 of those claims being wrongful death claims.

The GM recall fund was establish in order to address the 2.5 million claims that stem from defective ignition switches in the Chevrolet Cobalt, Chevrolet HHR, Pontiac G5, Pontiac Solstice , Saturn Ion, and Saturn Sky vehicles, that were manufactured between 2003-2007.

The defective ignition switches cause the vehicle to suddenly shut off if heavy key chains are used or if the ignition is jarred, which can occur when a vehicle is involved in an accident. The ultimate result of these defective ignition switches is that the driver may lose control of their vehicle or the GM airbags may fail to deploy, which in turn increases the risk of serious, if not fatal injury.

As of December 1, 2014, over 2,215 GM claims have been confirmed. The deadline to file these claims, with the GM Compensation fund, is on January 31, 2015, therefore; the number of claims is expected to rise in the next few weeks.
GM recall injury lawsuits are also being filed against the auto maker in state and federal courts nationwide. Those claims also involved injuries associated defective ignition switches, but those are on other GM vehicles, which are therefore; not part of the GM compensation fund.

The claims that have been filed against General Motors, in federal court systems, have been consolidated for pretrial in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, and is part of a Multidistrict Litigation, or MDL. These cases will be heard by U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman to reduce duplicative discovery into common issues, avoid conflicting pretrial rulings and to serve the convenience of all the parties, witnesses and the courts.

The first cases are expected to go before Judge Jesse Furman in January of 2016. For more information, visit

October 29, 2014

Chemical Propellant Linked to Exploding Airbags Used by Takata

Airbags in motor vehicles use a propellant to inflate the airbags in the event of a motor vehicle crash, but Takata airbags has been using a chemical propellant, to inflate their airbags, that has been the cause for a recall of nearly 8 million vehicles. The problem with the Takata airbags is that to make their airbags inflate, they are using a dangerous chemical, aluminum nitrate, which can cause injury and death. When the airbags inflate and explode, they, cause shrapnel and other debris to enter the vehicle and can cause injury and death to the driver and passengers. To date, the use of Aluminum nitrate in the Takata airbags has been linked to at least four deaths and a number of injuries.

Takata airbags are mostly used by the automobile manufacturer Honda, and so far all the deaths associated with these airbags have been linked to Honda vehicles. Other vehicle manufacturers have had to make recalls, as well, but Honda has had the majority of the recalls associated with the use of Takata airbags.

To date, Takata is the only company that uses Aluminum nitrate as an airbag propellant. This chemical, though efficient at inflating the airbags in the speed needed to respond to a vehicle collision or impact, reacts negatively to moisture. This negative reaction to moisture, in turn, increases the power of the chemical reaction, and therefore; causes the airbags to explode. The explosion causes debris and other particles to enter the vehicle cabin and can hurt the driver and passengers in the vehicle. As stated, previously; four people have died as a result of using Takata airbags, to date.

The chairman of Takata Corporation, which was founded in 1930, is Mr. Shigehisa Takada. Earlier this week, Mr. Takada publicly apologized for the defective airbags. He said the company has put aside about $28 million dollars to pay for the recalls, in addition to the almost $70 million already spent.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has launched a campaign to raise awareness about the risk of the Takata airbags, specifically in areas with warmer climates, such as Florida, Puerto Rico, Hawaii and the Gulf of Mexico. The NHTSA has urged owners of vehicles with Takata airbags to seek immediate repairs. Therefore; all vehicle owners with Takata airbags need to have their vehicles repaired, especially those in warmer climates, as they are more seriously affected, due to higher moisture levels and the reaction that causes with the chemical Aluminum nitrate used by Takata airbags.

October 6, 2014

Motorcycle Safety In the State of Maryland

Driving a motor cycle takes skill and concentration. In the state of Maryland, there are voluntary courses that riders can take, in order to get the proper training and strategies to operating a motorcycle. These courses are offered to new, as well as, experienced riders. Since the MVA's Motorcycle Safety Program began, over 100,000 people have learned to ride motorcycles. The criteria for the MVA Motorcycle Safety program, meets and exceeds the standards established by the Motorcycle Safety Foundation.

Maryland residents under the age of 18, who want to apply for a motorcycle license, however, need to complete either of the two motorcycle safety courses offered by the MVA. One is the Basic Rider Course and the other is the Alternate Basic Rider Course. In these courses, riders learn special skills and mental strategies necessary to ride a motorcycle responsibly. They also learn awareness of motorcycle safety and state laws.

In the program riders are given certain safety tips. Some of which are:

- Make ones' self visible. This means wearing riding gear that makes you more visible in traffic in addition to providing protection in the event of a crash. Wear bright colors and reflective strips/decals at night.
- Ride with your headlights on and in areas where you can be seen easily. Do not ride in a vehicle driver's blind spot. If you can't see them, they can't see you.
- Give yourself ample space and time to react.
- Always use your turn signals as well as hand signals, I possible. Avoid weaving in and out of traffic lanes and flash your brake lights when you are slowing down and before stopping.
- Be Non-aggressive and cooperative. Share the road with other drivers.
- Make sure and wear the proper gear when riding your motorcycle, which should include, over the ankle boots, gloves, protective jacket, pants and a helmet with a face shield or protective glasses.

Therefore; if you are involved in a motorcycle accident, first seek immediate emergency treatment and then contact an attorney to help you handle your claim. Our office is open Monday-Friday 8 am-5:30 pm, but we are always available by phone and email.

September 4, 2014

Check Your Vehicle for Recalls Through a New Government Website

A new government website will help consumers, who are looking to buy a used vehicle, make a better decision about the vehicle they are interested in purchasing, by publishing open recalls on used vehicles. The government website, can use a vehicle's Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) to list any open recalls on the vehicle. Currently, there is no law against preventing used car dealerships from selling recalled vehicles that haven't been fixed. Therefore; it is up to the consumer to be educated and well versed on the used vehicle they intend to buy, and that is where this new website comes into play.

Consumers, are therefore, advised to visit the website where these recalled vehicles will be listed by going to Once you are on the site, you can subscribe and opt to receive an email for all vehicle recall notifications. Every consumer that subscribes can sign up for up to five vehicle notifications. If not, you can just put the make and model year of the vehicle and/or the vehicles VIN and any and all recalls for that vehicle will show up.

June 16, 2014

Automobile Recalls at an All Time High in 2014

Since February of this year, Toyota Motor Corporation and General Motors Corporation have both announced vehicle recalls and have admitted to a blatant neglect towards consumer welfare and safety concerns. 2014 will most likely result in a rash of recalls and set tally records on safety related recalls in a single year.

The criteria for recalls has shifted, it use to be a compliance with laws or whether there were technical problems with a vehicle, but it has now shifted to whether the products can assure customers safety and peace of mind.

Toyota Motor Corp. has been one of the companies with the greatest recall in the recent years. In early June of 2014, Toyota Motor Corp agreed to pay a record $1.2 billion fine to U.S. Regulators to settle a criminal investigation into their unintended acceleration tied to defective floor mats and "sticky pedals" on some of their models. The "sticky pedals" problem was linked to 37 deaths worldwide.

In regards to, General Motors Corp., they too had issues with recalls. In their case it was disclosed that between 2003 and 2011 there were 2.6 million cars that had faulty ignition switches that ultimately led to 13 deaths. It became apparent that the ignitions would unexpectedly switch to accessory mode and shut off the engines, which then disabled the airbags and the power steering, on some of their vehicles. GM has since issued 29 other recalls of 15.8 million cars and trucks.

However; advances in automobile technology have made vehicles today safer than they were 15, 10, even five years ago, according to the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety.

Regardless, if your vehicle has a recall, it is at no expense to you. The cost to fix your vehicles' problem is on the manufacturer. So, if your vehicle has a recall, simply take your vehicle to your dealership and they will be responsible for the recall and the costs towards fixing whatever needs to be fixed.

Also, not all recalls are safety related and not all recalls affect every vehicle that fits the criteria for the recall. Some problems are environmental. For example, tires can fail for a number of reasons that could include salt on the road, which is normal during Midwestern winters but not likely in the South.

In order to see if your vehicle has been recalled for any reason you can go to the manufacturer's website or to and search under car recalls. You can and may also want to contact your dealer or check at under recalls and defects.

May 13, 2014

Online Vision Certification Service Award Given to the Maryland MVA

The StateScoop 50 has given the honor of the Innovation of the Year Award to the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration (MVA) for their Online Vision Certification Service. The honorees were chosen by its readers and were announced at a reception in Baltimore, Maryland, earlier this month. The StateScoop 50 organization recognizes and awards programs and/or individuals for their achievements and contributions to the state and local government IT community. Therefore, at the reception, the MVA was given the honor for their Online Vision Certification Service.

The Online Vision Certification Service was launched in 2013 with the intention to reduce branch office walk-in traffic and customer wait times. The service allows drivers to easily renew their licenses online. Before this program was implemented, drivers over the age of 40 had to visit their vision provider to complete a paper eye exam form and either mail it in or visit a branch office in order to renew their license, but with this new program, drivers over the age of 40 can take the vision test at a participating eye physicians office and the results are submitted electronically to the MVA, without having to make the driver either mail the test results form in or visit the MVA to renew their license. So drivers over the age of 40 have the ability to renew their license online.

There are over 600 provider locations that participate with this MVA Online Vision Certification Service Program. The list of all providers can be found by searching "vision" at or through the MVA's website at and clicking on the Online Vision Certification Service link.

Since being implemented, there have been well over 10,000 eye exam results submitted to the MVA. There is no extra cost to the providers to sign up for the service. All one needs is a computer and an internet connection. The program, was however, funded, by NIC Maryland, through the self-funded eGovernment services contract with the State Department of Information Technology (DoIT).

The NIC is the nation's leading provider of official state government portals, online services, and secure payment processing solutions. NIC's eGovernment service serves to help reduce costs and increase efficiencies for government agencies, citizens, and businesses across the United States. NIC provides eGovernment solutions for over 3,500 federal, state and local agencies nationwide.

April 29, 2014

2014 List of Top 10 Vehicles that Cause the Most Property Damage recently released the 2014 list of vehicles that cause the most property damage when involved in automobile accidents. The list is mainly comprised of pickup trucks and SUV's. Vehicles that tend to weigh more than passenger vehicles. The vehicles on the list tend to generate the biggest property damage claims and therefore; carry the heftiest liability insurance bills of the more that 750 2014 model year vehicles analyzed by in its annual car insurance comparison study.

The top 10 vehicles considered to carry the biggest liability bills and therefore are likely to cause the most property damage are:
1) Ford F-250
2) GMC Sierra 2500
3) Ford F-350
4) Ram 1500
5) Infiniti QX80
6) Dodge Durango
7) Toyota Tundra
8) Jeep Grand Cherokee
9) Cadillac Escalade
10) Chevrolet Silverado 1500

The property damage liability portion of a persons' automobile insurance policy is generally a reflection of claims made against other owners of the same kind of vehicle. Property damage liability coverage pays when you damage someone else's car or property. Most drivers carry much lower limits on property damage liability than for bodily injury, that way their insurance premiums can be lower/smaller.

Regardless of the vehicle you own, premiums can and do differ from state to state and vehicle to vehicle. The common element however, is that the vehicles that cause the biggest property damage are vehicles with bumpers that do not match up with the bumpers found on sedan, coupes or passenger cars.

It is the height difference in bumpers between vehicles that cause the greatest damage. The federal government sets minimum bumper performance requirements for passenger vehicles, but those regulations do not apply to vans, SUV's or pickup trucks. Hence, SUV's , vans and pickup trucks have bumpers that are anywhere between 20-26 inches higher from the ground then passenger vehicles. Passenger vehicles are usually only 16-20 inches higher than the ground. This means that when trucks and SUV's collide with passenger vehicles, their bumpers can no right past each other, and depending on the force of the impact, can bypass the bumpers and go directly into the body of the vehicle and therefore; cause greater damage. Sometimes, bumpers overlap or even slide off each other, instead of becoming engaged, and therefore the result is extensive vehicle body damage.

April 16, 2014

Autonomous Vehicles May Be Introduced In the District of Columbia

A couple of states in the United States have begun to legalize the operation of autonomous vehicles. Autonomous vehicles are also known as driveless cars, driver-free cars and self-driving cars. By Autonomous it is meant that a vehicle is capable of fulfilling the human transportation capabilities of a traditional car. An autonomous vehicle is capable of sensing its environment and navigating without human input or interaction. These vehicles sense their surroundings with the use of radars, GPS and computer vision. It is with these tools that the vehicle is able to navigate through streets as well as obstacles on the road. These vehicles keep track of their position even when conditions change in their surroundings.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has established an official classification system for Autonomous vehicles. The 5 levels are as follows:

Level 0: Drivers completely control the vehicle at all times;

Level 1: Individual vehicle controls are automated, such as electronic stability control or automatic braking;

Level 2: Two or more controls can be automated in unison, such as cruise control in combination with lane keeping; and

Level 3: The driver can fully cede control of all safety-critical functions in certain conditions. The car senses when conditions require the driver to retake control and providers a sufficiently comfortable transition time for the driver to do so.

Level 4: The vehicle performs all safety-critical functions for the entire trip, with the driver not expected to control the vehicle at any time. As this vehicle would control all functions from start to stop, including all parking functions.

These autonomous vehicles may be introduced in the District of Columbia in the coming weeks since new rules were introduced last week. The District of Columbia Department of Motor Vehicles published a set of new guidelines last Friday, in accordance with the Autonomous Vehicle Act of 2012, to allow drivers to obtain licenses for self-driving vehicles, and if there are no objections, will go into effect in 30 days. If this goes into effect, the District of Columbia would be the first jurisdiction to license self-driving operators. The process to obtain these special self-driving operator licenses is as simple as taking a self-driver training seminar, filling out the proper paperwork and paying the $20 fee. The application process means that each person trying to obtain this special license needs to acknowledge that they will be deemed the "Driver" of the vehicle while it is operating in autonomous mode, and are therefore responsible for speeding, rolling thru stop signs, and missing or passing thru traffic signals. This means that they are subject to the same traffic laws that non-autonomous cars and drivers have to follow.

Each applicant will also have to complete a training seminar and obtain certification in the operation of autonomous vehicles. These courses will be provided by self-driving car dealerships and manufacturers. Once the course is completed, forms executed, license fee paid and license obtained, each driver will have a new "A" printed on their license to show that they are certified to operate an autonomous vehicle. Once the operator is issued a license the final step is to apply for a special license plate that will only be used for self-driving cars.

Some of the advantages of autonomous vehicles are that fewer traffic accidents and collisions will happen, due to the system's increased reliability and faster reaction time compared to human drivers, roadway capacity will increase and traffic congestion decreased due to the reduced need for safety gaps and the ability to better manage traffic flow, relief of vehicle occupants from driving, higher speed limits, removal of constraints on occupants' state, due to the fact that the drivers age, blindness, distractedness, intoxication or other impairment will not matter, and alleviation of parking scarcity, are a few of the advantages of autonomous vehicles.

Some of the obstacles however are Liability for damages, software reliability, resistance for individuals to give up control of their vehicles, Cyber security, the implementation of legal framework and the establishment of government regulations for self-driving cars, drivers will become less experienced when manual driving is needed and the loss of driver related jobs.